Sir Roger Kynaston

 

Son of  Griffinus Kynaston and Margaretta Hoord, father of Humfridus Kynaston and husband of Lady Elizabetha Grey

Roger was of Middle and Hordley, Shropshire born c.1433.

Roger was Constable of Denbigh Castle in 1454 and supported the Yorkists during the Wars of the Roses, particularly distinguishing himself during the battle of Bloreheath on  23rd September 1459 when “He vanquished and slew the Lord James Audley (descendant of the Touchet family) and took his arms, Ermine, a chevron gules, ever since borne quarterly by the Kynastons of Hordley”  For a detailed description of the battle and Roger’s role in it see Attachment Roger was  actually summoned to the presence of the new King, Edward IV, some 18 months after his accession in 1461, and knighted and presented with the arms and certain land of Lord Audley 

A month later, he fought against the King’s forces at Ludford near Ludlow and was eventually attainted for high treason. However, the penalty of attainder was not inflicted for he and many others received the royal pardon in 1467 on payment of a fine.

He founded the line of Kynaston of Hordley.  His Coat of Arms was:

Quarterly of six:

1. Ermine, a chevron gules (Kynaston the Audley Coat) – won in battle 1459

2. Vert, two boars passant or (Powys) – Arms of greatx4 grandmother Gweruilla Vychan

3. Gules, on a chevron or three mulletts sable (Franklin) – Arms of greatx5 grandfather Griffith Kynaston

4. Argent, on a chief or a raven sable (Hoorde) – Arms of mother’s family Margaretta Hoord

5. Gules, a lion rampant argent within a bordure engrailed of the second (Grey de Powys) – Arms of wife’s family Elizabetha Grey

6. Or, a lion rampant gules (Bleddyn ap Cynfyn) – Arms of Greatx11 grandfather Bleddyn ap Cynfyn Princeps Walliae who was slain in 1075 

Roger was appointed for life as Escheator and Sheriff of Merioneth, was Constable of Harlech and was Sheriff of Shropshire in 1461 and 1470. He was knighted at Tewkesbury on 4th May 1471.

Guto’r Glyn, the Bard of Valle Crucis (1445-1475) wrote a “cywydd” in Roger’s honour entitled “Syr Rsoier Cinast o’r Cnwein” (Cinastor is still in use today by Welsh speakers. For they call Plaskynaston Plascinast).  “Cywyddau” were written by the bards to honour several members of the Kynaston family.

Roger married, firstly, c.1450 Elizabetha Cobham, borne c.1435, daughter of Danielus Cobham of Sterburgh Castle, Kent, and widow of Richard, 7th Lord Strange.  They had one son:

Sir Thomas Kynaston who was the heir and Sheriff of Shropshire in 1507/08. He married Maria Corbett, daughter of Sir Robertus Corbett of Morton, Shropshire, but he did not have “legitimate offspring”.

Elizabeth died in 1453.

Roger secondly married Lady Elizabeth Grey of Powis Castle, Welshpool, Montgomeryshire in 1465. They had the following children: 

 

Jana Kynaston born c. 1466. She married Rogerus Thornes of Shropshire c.1480.  Roger was the son of Thomas Thornes and Mary Corbet; Thomas was born c.1455 and died 1531

Humphridus Kynaston born c. 1468

 

Lancelotus Kynaston born c.1469

 

Margaretta Kynaston who married Richardus Hanmer, son of Griffith Hannmer of Hanmer and Elin Dutlon. They had a son:

 

Sir Thomas Hanmer.         

 

Johanna Kynaston who married Thomas Sturrey of Rossall, Shropshire      

 

Jana Kynaston who married, firstly, Thomas Corbet of Leigh, Shropshire and they had son:

 

John Corbett

 

Jana secondly married Mr Tanet of Abertanet and, finally, Edwardus Sackuill

 

Maria Kynaston was born c.1470 in Harlech Castle, Merioneth. Maria married Hywel ap Jenkin ap Iowerth.  They had two sons:

 

Howel Kenkin who died of the plague in 1495 

 

Humphrey Jenkin who continued the line

 

Ermine Kynaston who married Ellisius Eton (Eyton) of Denbighshire         

 

During the final year of the War of the Roses, Roger appears in the following story. “Henry did not receive a rapturous welcome in Wales. On 8 August 1485, at Haverfordwest, he received a crushing blow - John Savage, nephew of Henry's stepfather, and the powerful Welsh lord, Rhys ap Thomas, were not planning to support his cause. Of course, they had promised otherwise while he was in France but Richard III suspected both men of disloyalty - and before Henry landed, he made certain they understood the penalty of treason. With this crushing news, even the professed loyalty of Pembroke was small consolation. Henry's march from Havefordwest northeast to Cardigan and there to Machynlleth (about 100 miles from the Dale settlement) is not documented. He arrived at Machynlleth on 14 August and wrote a letter to Sir Roger Kynaston, the guardian of the Grey estates; to pass safely to Shrewsbury, Henry needed - at the very least - Kynaston's inaction. The guardian didn't need to declare for him but he could at least not impede his progress. Whatever Kynaston's decision, Henry did pass safely through to Shrewsbury. To get to this point, his force had marched through the mountains of Wales but they had the continual arrival of good news to cheer them on the lonely journey - supporters were marching to join them, bringing along much-needed supplies. Among these supporters was Rhys ap Thomas, who finally decided to honour his previous promise. Rhys later said he brought almost 2000 men with him; if true, his force made up a third of Henry's entire army. They were in time to join Henry at Shrewsbury, the traditional gateway to the English midlands; they marched along the old Roman road even as supporters sent along money to pay the mercenary troops. But at Shrewsbury, Henry's progress was no longer easy.”  

 

Elizabeth Grey, was born c.1440 and died 1501 in Shropshire.  She was the sister of Richardus Grey and daughter of Henry Grey, Earl Tankerville of Powis Castle, Welshpool, Montgomeryshire, born c.1419 and died on 13th January 1449/50. He married Antigone Plantagenet Countess of Tankerville, born 1414; Antigone was the illegitimate daughter of Humphrey Plantagenet, Prince of England, the son, in turn, of Henry IV, King of England. Antigone’s mother was Eleanor Cobham, who died at Beaumaris Castle on 7th July 1452.

 

Roger died on 28th October 1495 aged 62. His widow Elizabeth took up residence at Myddle Castle, which Roger possessed through his first wife (who was the widow of Lord Strange, from whom she had inherited it as her dower house in 1449). Although the title to the Castle was disputed by the Strange family. 

 

Almost all the above data comes from the 1623 Visitation to Shropshire, recorded by John Kynaston, eldest son of Edward Kynaston and Katherine Lloyd. The only exceptions are the Christian name of Ermine Kynaston which comes fro LDS records and references to the Bards plus data about Roger’s military career and knighthood which come from “ The History of Plaskynaston” by Dennis Davies July 1951 revised October 1964.

 

Transcripts of the “cywyddau” with an English translation can be found among the Wynnstay manuscripts of the National Library of Wales (N.L.W. Journ. 11 page 3.

 

Other sources

 

1.        Faris, D. "Plantagenet Ancestory of Seventeenth-Century Colonists" pp.169.

2.        Evans, C.F.H. and Leet, I.H. "Thomas Lloyd, Dolobran to Pennsylvania" pp.7.

3.        Roberts, G.B. "The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States" pp.82.

4.        Weis, F.L. "The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215" line 31.

5.        Weis, F.L. "Ancestral Roots" 7th Edition, line 1A.

  

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